70th anniversary – last run of the #7 streetcar in Marda Loop

Wednesday, November 7

To celebrate the final run of the #7 streetcar, we will be drawing for a Marda Loop prize package, including a free one-month bus pass courtesy of Calgary Transit!
To enter, share a photo of the #7 bus and tag your favorite Marda Loop Business AND US
@visitmardaloop! Contest ends on November 14 and winners will be drawn via Facebook and Instagram.

The “Marda Loop” streetcar

It was a typical Sunday, November 7, 1948, the suburban quiet occasionally interrupted by the familiar squeak and rattle of the old South Calgary streetcar.  By Monday morning’s rush hour (such as it was back then), a diesel bus was temporarily on the route. The streetcar tracks were soon torn up.  A trolley bus (an electric bus powered by overhead wires) took over in February 1949 and ran until 1974.

Since 1913, the No. 7 streetcar had travelled a counter-clockwise loop around South Calgary: It came up 14th Street to 26th Avenue, travelled west to 20th Street, rolled down the hill to the corner of 34th Avenue, travelled east on 34th, and then turned back down 14th Street to the center of town.  The route was part of an extensive streetcar network developed in the early 20th century to connect the center of town to far-flung industrial areas and new “streetcar suburbs” like South Calgary.

The South Calgary route took on more passengers after the opening of Currie Barracks in 1933, a short walk away from the closest stop, and more still as the military base grew during World War 2.  By the late 1940s, the war was over, and Calgary was on the edge of another boom following the big oil strike in Leduc in 1947. Next to South Calgary, new suburbs were springing up in Altadore and Knob Hill.  All of Calgary’s streetcars at this time were still the originals, carefully maintained through lean years of economic depression and war. With Calgary’s new growth, all of them were replaced by busses by 1950.

The new No. 7 trolley bus, powered by a web of overhead electrical wires, took a different route than the old streetcar – it went straight down 33rd Avenue and turned around at a loop where the Petro Canada is now.  This was not far past the Marda Theatre, which opened in 1951 at the corner of 20th Street where Global Pets is today (renamed the Odeon in 1964, demolished in 1990).

Marda Loop takes its name from the theatre and these two “loops” – the old streetcar loop around South Calgary, and the later trolley bus loop on 33rd Avenue.  And the No. 7 route designation has never changed. The legacy of the streetcar lives on!

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